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Construction & regeneration
1 hour ago - Stephen Giles
Gallery

Snow Hill Wharf - July & August Update

Excellent progress is being made on the brickwork across the site, with the tower now progressing to level 14, to the point where it is beginning to make an appearance on the skyline.

Click view full post for another fabulous update from Stephen, with new visuals of The Regent - The Gun Quarters tallest residential tower.

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Snow Hill Wharf - July & August Update





Excellent progress is being made on the brickwork across the site, with the tower now progressing to level 14, to the point where it is beginning to make an appearance on the skyline.

Click view full post for another fabulous update from Stephen, with new visuals of The Regent - The Gun Quarters tallest residential tower.


The final phase of Snowhill Wharf was released this week.

The Regent, as it will be known, will be the Gun Quarters tallest residential tower - standing at 21 storeys tall (220 feet).

It currently resides on floor 14 - as the below pictures will show.

Backing up onto the canal system, The Regent will deliver a total of 108 one- and two-bedroom apartments, and even includes two top floor penthouses.

New visuals have officially been released this week, showing how the project sits within its new surroundings and the draw dropping views residents will have of the skyline.

UPDATE: August 1-4

The Colmore:

The Fazeley:

The Lancaster & The Barker:

From left to right: The Barker, The Lancaster, The Regent, The Colmore.

July 21

Words and photos by Stephen Giles, with artists impressions from Berkeley Group.

TWITTER: Buildsweare
INSTAGRAM: Itsyourbirmingham

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20 passion points
Construction & regeneration
03 Aug 2020 - Stephen Giles
News & Updates

Construction of 103 Colmore Row - July and August 2020

The structural steelwork has officially been constructed at the top of the building, with the elegant glass facade quickly catching up, and it's looking pristine. However, the best is yet to come!

Click the post for a tremendous gallery of update photos from Daniel, Stephen, and Elliott. 

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Construction of 103 Colmore Row - July and August 2020





The structural steelwork has officially been constructed at the top of the building, with the elegant glass facade quickly catching up, and it's looking pristine. However, the best is yet to come!

Click the post for a tremendous gallery of update photos from Daniel, Stephen, and Elliott. 


As the pictures show, the steelwork has reached the top floor, with the buildings stylish facade rapidly coming along.

The next phase of development will see the design & manufacturing of the glass facade (Focchi Group) for the top floor lantern restaurant, where restaurateurs will benefit from 8 metre high ceilings & breath-taking 360o views of the city. We cannot wait!

Enjoy the update.

1st August:

Photos by Stephen Giles.

31st July:

29th July:

25th July:

Photos by Elliott Brown.

24th July:

 

 
 
 
 
Photos by Daniel Sturley

21st July

Photos by Elliott Brown.

21st July:

Photos by Stephen Giles.

18 July:

Photos by Elliott Brown.

 
TWITTER: @Buildsweare

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30 passion points
Construction & regeneration
29 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
News & Updates

Congreve Passage from Paradise Place in 2010 to Paradise Birmingham in 2020

As of July 2020, Congreve Passage has been reopened by Paradise Birmingham between Chamberlain Square and Great Charles Street Queensway. It runs between One Chamberlain Square and the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. It was closed in late 2015 (or early 2016) to allow for the demolition of Birmingham Central Library and the construction of One Chamberlain Square (that is now complete)

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Congreve Passage from Paradise Place in 2010 to Paradise Birmingham in 2020





As of July 2020, Congreve Passage has been reopened by Paradise Birmingham between Chamberlain Square and Great Charles Street Queensway. It runs between One Chamberlain Square and the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. It was closed in late 2015 (or early 2016) to allow for the demolition of Birmingham Central Library and the construction of One Chamberlain Square (that is now complete)


Congreve Passage links Chamberlain Square to Great Charles Street Queensway and Paradise Circus Queensway. It was once called Congreve Street before Birmingham Central Library was built from 1969 until it opened in 1974. When the new Library of Birmingham opened in Centenary Square in 2013, the old Central Library closed. It was demolished from late 2015 into 2016. This meant that Paradise Birmingham had to close off Congreve Passage. And it remained closed until they reopened it near the end of July 2020.

21st August 2010 on Congreve Passage

Heading out of Chamberlain Square I headed up Congreve Passage away from the crowds. There used to be trees here and flower beds. On the left of the Central Library was a poem by William Hutton from 1803.

There was also pieces of art on the wall of the library behind the trees.

This concrete footbridge linked the Central Library to the Museum & Art Gallery.

Looking back to Chamberlain Square and Victoria Square. Was overseas students in the square with orange backpacks and jackets.

Steps on the right go to Paradise Place. Which at the time was a side entrance into Paradise Forum.

Road sign for Congreve Passage, close to the Great Charles Street Queensway end.

5th August 2012 on Congreve Passage

Flower towers were along Congreve Passage in an attempt to make it look nice. There was also a Victorian style lamppost on the right.

Despite the flowers, the concrete bridge was still there (it wouldn't be demolished until 2016).

A nice red flower bed surrounded by a concrete base. While it looks nice, the concrete would have to go by 2016.

4th November 2012 on Congreve Passage

Pair of cherry pickers outside of the Central Library on Congreve Passage. In the last years of the libraries life, it had the Todo es Posible street art by Lucy McLaughlan. But it wouldn't survive the 2016 demolition.

20th February 2016 at Congreve Passage

Paradise Birmingham had closed off Congreve Passage to the public. No access to Centenary Square / Broad Street / Copthorne Hotel.

Pedestrians were diverted via what was Edmund Street and Margaret Street if they wanted to get to Great Charles Street Queensway. Maybe the last time to see the Todo es Possible art before the library was knocked down on this side during 2016.

8th February 2020 look at Congreve Passage

The view from Paradise Circus Queensway near Great Charles Street Queensway. There was now a gate / fence at the end of Congreve Passage to the right of the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery.

My first look at Congreve Passage in 4 years. It looks different. No Central Library or concrete footbridge. You can see the statue of Queen Victoria, Victoria Square House and the Town Hall from this vantage point.

21st July 2020 on Congreve Passage

I saw on Twitter that Congreve Passage was now open again, so I got the bus into town and walked up from the Bullring. Saw a PCSO on a bicycle near One Chamberlain Square.

It has changed a lot around here. Paving in Chamberlain Square is almost finished. One Chamberlain Square is complete, and The Dishroom is now open (delayed by the lockdown).

The old Congreve Passage road signs remains on BM & AG.

The museum exterior is looking much cleaner, especially since the concrete footbridge was demolished 4 years ago. The stonework was also restored.

Getting towards Great Charles Street Queensway. Site on the left is still behind hoardings.

Looking up Congreve Passage towards Chamberlain Square from Great Charles Street Queensway. It's good to be open again after so many years. Looks better and cleaner too!

From here you can either walk to the Jewellery Quarter, crossing at the lights. Or walk past Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery on Great Charles Street Queensway (the museum remains closed sadly due to the pandemic).

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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50 passion points
Construction & regeneration
27 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Newhall Square: From the Elkington Electroplating Works and Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry to The Whitmore Collection

It has been over 20 years since the Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry on Newhall Street closed for good. Since then the site has been the development site called Newhall Square. With hotels and apartments around a square, near the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. Heritage buildings have been fully restored and incorporated into the development.

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Newhall Square: From the Elkington Electroplating Works and Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry to The Whitmore Collection





It has been over 20 years since the Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry on Newhall Street closed for good. Since then the site has been the development site called Newhall Square. With hotels and apartments around a square, near the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. Heritage buildings have been fully restored and incorporated into the development.


Newhall Square

Newhall Square is located on Newhall Street in the Jewellery Quarter. Between Fleet Street and Charlotte Street. On one side is the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. It was historically the site of the Elkington Silver Electroplating Works from 1838. Built opposite of the Birmingham Assay Office, it was the 19th century silver electroplating factory of George Elkington. The much larger premises was mostly demolished in the mid 1960s. To the back was the Whitmore Arm (also known as Miss Colmore's Arm) (this is now filled in) and the Whitmore Warehouse (which survives to this day).

The Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry was located in the buildings at 144 Newhall Street from 1951 until it closed for good in 1997 (most but not all of the contents moved to Thinktank which opened at Millennium Point in Eastside during 2001). It was the home for the last 50 years of the 20th Century of the 1797 Smethwick Engine, and the City of Birmingham locomotive (which was moved out in the year 2000).

144 Newhall Street has been a Grade II listed building since 2004. Today it is addressed as 2 Newhall Square, and is now home to Glancy Nicholls Architects, who are based in The Engine Room to the rear.

Whitmore Warehouse to the back of Newhall Square was also given a Grade II listed building status in 2004. It dates to the mid 19th century. It was formerly part of the museum complex, and before that part of the Elkington Works.

The mid to late 20th century museum buildings were demolished in 2006 for a project called the Jewellery Box. This was probably later renamed to Newhall Square.

The Travelodge hotel along Charlotte Street was open by the late 2000s. It wouldn't be until 2014 before construction would begin on what would become Staycity ApartHotels. This is also on Charlotte Street and faces the canal as well. It opened in 2016. The final phase to complete Newhall Square didn't start until 2018. This would be The Whitmore Collection, including the restoration of the old Whitmore Warehouse. Finally being complete during 2020. Some 23 years after the museum closed down. But some 14 years since the land clearance began.

 

2009

I started taking photos of Newhall Square in April 2009. And continued getting the occasional update for the next 11 years. First views over the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal where there is a viewpoint area from Newhall Street. Islington Gates which is to the left of the canal was already built by this point. View to the remains of the Whitmore Warehouse.

To the right you can see the Travelodge hotel and the back of The Engine Room at 144 Newhall Street.

The locks on the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal near Newhall Street. There used to be steps that went down to the canal from here. The Islington Gates development seen to the left of the canal.

In November 2009 I got my first photos of 144 Newhall Street. Which was the former Elkington Electroplating Works. On this building was a blue plaque from the Birmingham City Society (unveiled in 2004) about Alexander Parkes (1813-1890), who was the inventor of the first plastic. He worked for the Elkington, Mason & Company Electroplaters here from about 1840 until 1850.

This building on the left used to be the former entrance to the Museum of Science & Industry. It too has a blue plaque. This one from English Heritage about George Elkington who was a promotor of Electro-plating at his works on this site.

View of both buildings that used be the main entrance to the Elkington Electroplating Works. To the far right on the corner of Newhall Street and Charlotte Street is The Queens Arms public house.

2011

Not too many changes during July 2011, other than Newhall Square had hoardings up and offices To Let or For Sale.

The wasteland was being used as a car park at this point.

Would be years before another development began at Newhall Square.

Gates to the Newhall Square site from Newhall Street. Probably for staff only.

For some reason they had painted this building yellow. Even the hoardings covering the door.

2013

Now onto June 2013. Some demolition rubble spotted from the towpath of the canal not far from the Travelodge hotel.

They had now tarmaced the wasteland.

2014

By September 2014, construction was finally under way for the next phase, which would become the  Staycity ApartHotels.

By December 2014 the hotel construction was going on behind Whitmore Warehouse.

You could also see it from Newhall Street. The canal and Islington Gates are to the left. Travelodge to the far right.

2015

Just a couple of updates during 2015. In January 2015 the hotel was still under scaffolding.

By November 2015 it was nearing completion.

2016

In January 2016 the new Staycity ApartHotels building was complete. As seen from this canal view from the footbridge close to Fleet Street.

By April 2016 the Staycity ApartHotels was open. View down on Charlotte Street.

Some of the yellow signs of the Staycity ApartHotels on Charlotte Street.

Next to the Staycity ApartHotels on Charlotte Street ws a temporary car park.

You could also see it down the canal from the Saturday Bridge on Parade.

2017

A tempoary car park was at Newhall Square during January 2017. Behind is Glancy Nicholls Architects at The Engine Room. At the time the Ormiston Academies Trust was using 144 Newhall Street as Ormiston House.

View from the canal towpath towards the Travelodge hotel.

This would be the last year without construction activity on this site.

2018

Signs of activity at Newhall Square during January 2018. Associated Architects had designed a mixed-use development of purpose-built apartments for private rent.

This space would be built on and would complete the square within 2 and a half years.

By April 2018 construction had started on what would be called The Whitmore Collection. The view from the canal footbridge near Fleet Street.

Digging the foundations. The Newhall Street canal entrance / exit would be sealed off, meaning you would have to get onto the canal from other entrances. Also this old wall would eventually be replaced / go.

By June 2018 the steel girders were flying up.

In July 2018 the steel girders were visible from the Library of Birmingham at the Secret Garden.

2019

My last update before the lockdown was back in November 2019. View over the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal from Fleet Street. Staycity ApartHotels is to the left and The Whitmore Collection to the right.

On Newhall Street the building was at full height under scaffolding. It was being built by Winvic.

You can see The Whitmore Collection surrounding what used to be 144 Newhall Street (now 2 Newhall Square). The building with the George Elkington blue plaque was still painted yellow at the time. The building would have a Residents' Clubhouse, Free coffee and WiFi when complete.

2020

During the 4 long months of lockdown, Newhall Square was completed. And I was aware of it being complete and open by the summer. I was only able to travel into town in July 2020. I walked down Newhall Street and headed onto the new path alongside the canal.

This is the new entrance to the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal from Newhall Street. Much more appealing than the dark steps that used to be there before.

Could already see that the Whitmore Warehouse was finally restored, probably into apartments.

There is two sets of water features here with water jet fountains. Approximately near where the old Whitmore Canal Arm used to be in the 19th century.

Whitmore Warehouse hasn't looked this good since it was last used as part of the Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry. I think it was in here that the working Smethwick Engine used to be (now working at Thinktank).

First proper look into the square. Glancy Nicholls Architects are in The Engine House. To think 25 years ago this was part of the museum complex. Travelodge to the left.

I have memories of visiting the museum back in the 1990s and could not imagine it looking like this now. Wish I had a camera with me back then (if only a film one).

Heading out of Newhall Square past The Engine Room.

The exit to Newhall Street. Directly opposite is 141 Newhall Street.

Back onto Newhall Street, you can see how The Whitmore Collection was built onto Islington Gates at 110 Newhall Street. It makes a pleasing entrance to the canal. Lets hope the area is kept clean and litter free.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Construction & regeneration
24 Jul 2020 - Stephen Giles
Gallery

The Construction of Symphony Hall - July 2020

Designed to reconnect the city through the world class musical offerings at Symphony Hall, the new development is already a prominent new addition to Centenary Square.

Click 'view full post' for a wonderful set of images showcasing the development, with pictures from Stephen, Elliott and Daniel.

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The Construction of Symphony Hall - July 2020





Designed to reconnect the city through the world class musical offerings at Symphony Hall, the new development is already a prominent new addition to Centenary Square.

Click 'view full post' for a wonderful set of images showcasing the development, with pictures from Stephen, Elliott and Daniel.


TWITTER: Buildsweare

22nd July:

Photos by Stephen Giles

20th July:

Photos by Daniel Sturley

14th July:

Photos by Elliott Brown

AND HOW THE FRONTAGE WILL LOOK

A new application has surfaced showcasing revised plans for the metal gates/ decorated screens incorporating signage. These can be seen below:

The latest proposed artists impressions from Page/Park Architects.

PROJECT TEAM: 
DEVELOPER: Birmingham Performances Ltd
ARCHITECTS: Page\Park Architects 
CONTRACTOR: Galliford Try Construction
PROJECT MANAGER: David Stanley Consulting
COST CONSULTANT: PMP Consultants
MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL: Max Fordham LLP
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER: ARUP
WEBSITE: https://making-an-entrance.thsh.co.uk/
TWITTER: Buildsweare

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30 passion points

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